Ring of Lies audiobook receives a 5star review

The audiobook version of Ring of Lies has received it’s first review on  Audible.co.uk and I am delighted to say it’s been given 5 Stars!
Aaron P. Lazar  wrote on 10/02/2014
Overall:  5 stars
Performance: 5 stars
Story: 5 Stars

“I Didn’t Want to Stop Listening – Great Suspense!”

If you could sum up Ring of Lies in three words, what would they be?

Intriguing, page-turner, well-written

What other book might you compare Ring of Lies to, and why?

I would say this genre is simliar to Mary Higgens Clark’s books – and just as well done! The writing flowed seamlessly, the dialog felt completely natural, the suspense never let up, and the action scenes were riveting. I loved listening to this book!

What does Michelle Ford bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

I fell in love with Michelle Ford’s female English accent. It was gorgeous, and reminded me of a grown up Haley Mills based on my childhood memories of PollyAnna. (Not that this book is anything like PollyAnna!) Her voice is lyrical, warm, and simply beautiful. Ms. Ford’s American male accent was a bit “nasal” sounding for all of the American men in the story, and once in a great while she slipped from one accent to the other in the wrong places, but it was rare and didn’t bother me. I could NEVER do what this amazing narrator did, which is hold up a conversation with a Brit and an American all the way through the book. I imagine it might be very difficult to do, and I bow down to her immense talent.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

An innocent woman discovers shocking secrets about her husband after his death, aided by an FBI agent she can’t resist, and who has his own share of troubles to hide.

Any additional comments?

I really loved the main character, Grace. She was well-rounded and quite believable. Jack…well, I’m a guy. At first he ticked me off because of his situation at home. I believe in family first and no fooling around! But then more came out about Jack’s true situation (no spoilers here!) and in the end I empathized with him and was cheering him on.

I particularly loved the action scenes – there is a swamp scene where Grace and Jack are on the run from villains, dashing through the cold swamp waters…phenomenal! Also thoroughly enjoyed the description of the house in Florida. Wouldn’t mind going there right about now!

 

 

February Update

A belated Happy New Year!

2014 kicked off with a large portion of southern England underwater. While South Yorkshire has been battered intermittently by gale force winds, I’ve been beavering away in my office, and left wondering what happened to January.

My writing time has been divided between working on my current manuscript, speaking engagements, and dipping my toes into the mysterious world of forensic science.

I’ve long harboured the desire to write a crime novel, and when the opportunity to learn something about forensic science with FutureLearn arose, I grabbed it with both hands. FutureLearn is an online study program set up with the cooperation of educators from top UK and international universities.  The courses it offers are free and cover a wide range of topics, and are designed to appeal to a broad range of learners.  There’s even one on writing fiction. (Advertisement over!)

While I have a good grasp of human biology, its diseases and their aetiology, (I was a business coordinator in the NHS, after all), chemistry and physics leave me cold. That said I am fascinated by the world of forensic science and insist on watching every factual TV programme on the subject.

Over the past five weeks, I have learned about fingermarks, footmarks, (and just so there is no confusion, fingerprints and footprints are what we possess and ‘marks’ are what we leave behind on a surface). The course has also covered DNA, blood spatter patterns, toolmarks, and drugs.

As Edmund Locard, who not only formulated the basic principle of forensic science, and was known as the ‘Sherlock Holmes of France’ once said:

‘Wherever he steps, whatever he touches, whatever he leaves, even unconsciously, will serve as a silent witness against him.’

 Very useful for reminding the family that you will find out who removed the last slice of bread from the breadbin and who failed to place the butter back on the shelf in the fridge!

My other half, Stephen, bless him, is looking more and more worried by the day, by my choice of bedtime reading – The Crime Writer’s handbook, 65 Ways to kill your victim…in print, and with the subject matter of my next course – Forensic Science and Crime!

So while Stephen is asking about that mysterious substance I added to the casserole (it was pepper, honestly!) the time has come for me to get my head down and do more writing.

Until next time…