Reviews

Reviews for Ring of Lies have started to arrive. It’s always an anxious time for an author. Part of you is desparate to read what the reviewer had to say and the other part of you is scared to look. No author enjoys reading a bad review, after all you’ve spent the best part of a year working on your novel. But, and it’s a big BUT, you have to remember that reviews, like literary agents and publishers rejection letters, are subjective, and it’s not a case of one book suits all. Our taste in reading matter differs, just like our taste in clothes or wine.

So far, Ring of Lies, has been warmly received and here’s what The Romance Studio had to say about it:

Victoria Howard pens a suspenseful tale full of intrigue. Have to admit I guessed wrong about who the culprit was until near the end of the book. The trail gets complicated by Jack’s involvement with the FBI. He’s also in a relationship that gets pretty nasty and emotional when we see that motherhood doesn’t seem to be a part of his girlfriends’ makeup in any way. She’s one of those characters it’s easy to dislike even before we find out how despicable she really is.

This author is excellent in her use descriptive words that bring scenarios alive. Whether it’s a flaming car crash or the wilds of the Florida Everglades a reader can almost feel the flames or the heat and humidity. It’s fun to see Grace change. She starts as a housewife whose love for her spouse helped her deny the verbal and emotional abuse she has gone through. From there, even though panic attacks incapacitate her at times, she thrives and learns to fight her own battles in a good way. Ms. Howard is an author I want to read again.
Overall rating 4 Hearts
Dee Dailey
Reviewer, The Romance Studio
http://www.theromancestudio.com/

An author’s Guide to Promotion

Congratulations! Your book has been published. The hard work of writing, editing, and sweating over just the right word, are over. You can sit back and relax.

Or can you?

Now is the time to take off your “writer’s” hat and put on the “marketing” hat.

But surely marketing my book is down to the publisher?

Not quite. You, the author, are expected to promote your book. Publishers, even the big houses like Penguin and Simon and Schuster, have only so much money to spend on marketing, and most of that goes into a few big blockbuster titles. The more you can help to promote your book and increase sales, the happier your publisher will be.

Remember, marketing is about building relationships—with readers, bookstore owners who often recommend books, with the media, and with others who can help you reach them.

So how do you promote your book?

1. Create a website.

Every author should have their own, preferably with a domain name that people can easily search for. Your site can be as simple or as detailed as you like, but make sure it includes your name, the cover of your book, a news and events section, a contact section, and most of all, a link to purchase your book.

If you don’t have the skill to design your own site, there are many web designers who will build a site for you for a fee.

2. Hold a book launch

Independent bookstores and local libraries are often willing to host book launch parties for local authors. It need not be an expensive exercise, but be sure to contact the local media and let them know. There are also many web sites, such as www.britevents.com, where you can list your event for free. And don’t forget social networking sites, such as Facebook, Twitter, Myspace LinkedInetc.

If your budget can stretch to it mail out invitations. There are numerous online printers available. Vistaprint’s marketing postcards make excellent invitations, or if you have the computer skills, why not use Photoshop or Microsoft Publisher to design your own? Make sure you display your book cover, book title and your name in large print. I would also suggest you include some one-liners from positive reviews your book has received. (More on reviews shortly).

Don’t go overboard on catering. Most people will be happy with a cup of tea and a bun.

Make sure your book is in high profile – centre stage on a table. It’s also helpful to have a friend or relative willing to act as booksellers and manage the money.

3. Bookmarks, flyers, and business cards, etc.

Bookmarks are a great way of getting details of your book out there. Again, if you feel confident, you can design these yourself, or if you’re like me and don’t have an artistic bone in your body, I can recommend Mae at Baby Fresh Designs, http://www.babyfreshdesigns.com/authors.htm

4. Blogs, Twitter, and Author Forums.

Choose ones that work for you, are enjoyable, and reach your target audience. A quick search on Google will pull up hundreds of sites.

5. Book Reviews.

It is essential that you get your book reviewed. Most publishers are happy to send out review copies of your book – just ask. You can also check out your local newspaper to see if they have a book section. If they do, consider sending the reporter a copy of your book. There are numerous online review sites, such as Apex Reviews, and Front Street Reviews, who will accept galley proofs of novels, the review being published on their website.

6. Book signings.

Not to be confused with book launch parties, booksignings are usually held in bookstores. They can either be very successful or complete flops. I know—I’ve experienced both ends of the scale! Most bookstores are happy to host signings as it helps draw customers into the store. The store will usually advertise the event and put up posters. Some will even contact the local paper. Chat with the store manager to find out exactly what his/her requirements are and what he/she expects of you as the author.

Saturday morning is usually best. Too late in the day, and people are busy doing other things. Try to avoid clashing with the local football team’s home game and local holidays! Surprisingly, the weather can also influence the number of potential sales. Everyone wants to be outside on a hot sunny day. If the weather is bad, people are less likely to drive to the bookstore.

7. A final word.

There are hundreds of ways to promote your book. The above are just a few ideas to get your started. If you’re serious about marketing your book, be sure to read all you can about book promotion. I can recommend “A Seriously Useful Author’s Guide to Marketing and Publicising Books” by Mary Cavanagh.

Book Reviews

As all serious writers know a good review not only boosts your self-esteem, its also good for sales! I thought I’d take a break from working on my current manuscript and share the review for my soon-to-be published novel, The House on the Shore.

www.apexreviews.net

The House On The Shore

Victoria Howard

ISBN: 9781935407249

Vanilla Heart Publishing

Reviewed By Renee Washburn

Official Apex Reviews Rating: **** (4 stars)

Anna MacDonald is looking to start over. She’s just been passed over for a promotion that she’s eagerly awaited – and, to make matters worse, her own boyfriend is the supervisor that snubbed her. To top it all off, the lucky recipient of her desired position just happens to be – of all things – his new lover…ouch…

So, in an effort to wipe the slate clean, she retreats to the Scottish shore, establishing her new residence in an old, yet sturdy house owned by her grandparents. Her only plans? Soak up the splendor of her rustic surroundings and fulfill her lifelong dream of becoming a published author. Joined by her trusty Border collies, Ensay and Rhona, Anna couldn’t ask for a more opportune chance to start fresh while mending the broken pieces of her still-aching heart.

Little does she know, though, she won’t have the chance to enjoy her solitude for long. Shortly after her arrival, she makes the acquaintance of the handsome, charming Luke, a successful artist from across the pond, and the chemistry between the two of them can’t be denied for long. Soon caught up in the throes of a passionate love affair, Anna appears to be on the cusp of lasting happiness – but, alas, she eventually learns that bliss and trouble are often flip sides of the same coin, and when an unseen stranger begins escalating his efforts to end her life, she’s suddenly thrust in the midst of a sinister mystery that leaves her wondering just who wants her dead – and why…

The House On The Shore is an enjoyable read. In it, Victoria Howard presents a well-crafted page turner that unfolds at just the right pace, ensuring that the reader’s attention is held captive with each new mysterious development. Howard also does a commendable job of infusing her characters with vivid, palpable personality, framing their inclinations and reactions in the three-dimensional, thus making it easy for readers to relate to them in very real, practical terms.

A quick but compelling read, The House On The Shore is a can’t miss suspense thriller with a surprisingly potent punch, and one that fans of the genre are sure to enjoy.